Мои питомцы https://petforest.ru Интернет-площадка продажи животных, товаров и услуг для них Thu, 10 Dec 2020 07:32:36 +0000 ru-RU hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://petforest.ru/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/cropped-pet-32x32.png Мои питомцы https://petforest.ru 32 32 6 amazing big cats! https://petforest.ru/6-amazing-big-cats/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 08:10:21 +0000 http://adforest.scriptsbundle.com/petforest/?p=9503

The cat family is a rich and diverse collection of species, ranging from the domesticated house cat to the iconic lion.

BBC’s programme Big Cats gave us an insight into the secret lives of wild cats using cutting-edge technology. Here we explore more facts about these amazing animals.

A wild tiger is well camouflaged by the grass.

Tigers

Tigers are the largest of the cat family, which makes them the largest wild cat in the world! Adult tigers can weigh up to 363kg and measure up to 3.3 metres – nearly 11 feet!

A wild lion cub in the Kruger National Park in South Africa.

Lions

Lions have proven themselves to be the leading brain boxes of the big cat kingdom, solving puzzles that other big cats can’t.

A 4 year old female Jaguar named Curubanda at the Las Pumas wildlife sanctuary, Costa Rica. Image: World Animal Protection

Jaguars

Jaguars are highly adaptable and can survive in a range of habitats. They prefer to be near water, such as a tropical rainforest or swamp, but can also be in found in forests or grasslands.

 

Lynxes

Lynxes are highly solitary creatures and are rarely seen. The Iberian Lynx is the world’s most endangered cat.

A serval in the Serengeti, Tanzania.

Servals

The name ‘serval’ is derived from a Portuguese word meaning ‘wolf-deer’. Due to their striking appearance, these animals are sometimes called ‘the cat of spare parts’.

A cheetah mother and cub, Kenya.

Cheetahs

Cheetahs are famous for being the fastest land mammals on the planet, with a top speed of about 82mph. The black tear-shaped streaks on their face help to reflect the sun, aiding their vision when hunting.

Big Cats and our Not Entertainers Campaign

Many people love cats, and it’s easy to see why. But in the tourism industry, this love is being exploited for financial gain. Our Wildlife. Not Entertainers campaign focuses on how animals including lions and tigers are being abused in the name of tourist entertainment, and what you can do to help us to stop this.

Our petition to prevent Golden Tiger Co Ltd. from gaining a license for a new ‘Tiger Temple’ collected over 200,000 signatures. As part of our Wildlife. Not Entertainers campaign, we are working to prevent tigers from being exploited for selfies and other forms of tourist entertainment.

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Risks to Whales Today https://petforest.ru/risks-to-whales-today/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 08:07:22 +0000 http://adforest.scriptsbundle.com/petforest/?p=9500

Whales live in a place we know less about than the planet Mars.

Brought to life by programmes like Blue Planet 2, we’ve now seen the various threats facing whale populations. From ship strikes to pollution, to being caught in fishing equipment, whales need our help.

It’s hard not to be moved by images of whale’s stomachs showing plastic bags, fishing nets and ropes inside. These things appear as either causes or factors in the death of whales.

An important issue is fishing gear and the impact it has on whales. Often made from plastic and incredibly tough, fishing equipment can be a major risk to wildlife. Whales face the threat of being trapped in both fishing equipment that is actively being used and lost or dumped ‘ghost’ fishing gear – floating death traps drifting in our oceans.

Credit Line: Bob Talbot / Marine Photobank

Floating Death Traps

A floating rope can easily wrap around a flipper or tail, and the whale will be forced to drag the ghost gear with it – sometimes for years, resulting in exhaustion, starvation or even death. Reports have shown that 75% of living whales bear the scars of this kind of issue. Researchers from Aarhus University found that lines wrapped around a whale’s fin and body can increase the difficulty of swimming by 160%. Put that way, you start to get a sense of why exhaustion is such a major threat to trapped whales.

Equally sinister, big plastics like ghost nets and other floating rubbish are known to break down into what we call ‘microplastics’ – tiny particles of plastic less than 5mm in size. These microplastics are a threat to filter feeding whales who eat them accidentally.

Getting a true picture of the impact of human activity on whales is difficult, as scientists are not always able to study dead whales to find out why they died. But from the evidence available we know action is needed to protect them.

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We must remember animals https://petforest.ru/we-must-remember-animals-when-natural-disasters-strike/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 08:05:25 +0000 http://adforest.scriptsbundle.com/petforest/?p=9496

Natural disasters like earthquakes cause terrible destruction – and animals are often the forgotten victims.

Eight years ago, just before 5pm on 12 January, dogs began frantically barking all over Haiti. Seconds later the ground shook as a massive earthquake unleashed its tremendous power, killing over 240,000 people.

Such massive loss of life, was heart-breaking and incomprehensible. The earthquake caused catastrophic devastation in the capital city, Port-Au-Prince. Millions of people lost their homes and their way of life, in a country that was already the poorest in the Americas.

International humanitarian agencies and governments quickly dispatched human aid relief into the country but the Haitian government also needed help with the thousands of animals on the island that were injured and dying. Just 72 hours after the island was violently shaken, our vets were on the ground.


We worked hard to help animals, who are so often the forgotten victims of natural disasters

Support on the ground

Looking out of the window while flying in to Port-Au-Prince, our experienced vets could see the cataclysmic devastation the island had suffered. They knew it would be the toughest mission they had ever embarked on. As soon as the wheels touched down, the priority was to set up mobile veterinary clinics to bring relief to the maimed and injured animals suffering in the quake’s aftermath.

The mobile clinics raced from one site to another, meticulously working out how to reach as many animals as possible. To let Haitians know that help was on the way to their animals, the team came up with an innovative solution – the day before they were due to arrive at a village, one of them would drive along the precarious roads shouting messages through a megaphone. Not very high-tech, but effective. Every morning a long line of people would form with cats, dogs, pigs, cattle, horses and goats.

Working together

It quickly became apparent that it would be impossible for one organisation to help such a huge number of animals, so we collaborated with 20 other animal welfare organisations to form the Animal Relief Coalition for Haiti (ARCH). This enabled us to pool resources and maximise the number of animals we could help. Working flat-out, 70,000 animals were treated, many of whom would certainly have died without the help they received.

In 2010 most of Haiti’s animals had never seen a vet, vaccines were scarce and lack of refrigeration destroyed any vaccines that had been previously available. Rabies and anthrax were just two of the diseases that were vital to control, to stop their spread to the human population.


Forming the Animal Relief Coalition for Haiti (ARCH) was an essential part of our work in Haiti

Preparing for the future

Saving lives was the immediate priority eight years ago, but we also helped Haiti prepare for the long-term rehabilitation of animals and worked alongside the Haitian government and vets to deliver a better life for Haiti’s animals long after all the aid organisations had gone. Haiti is now much better prepared to care for its animals when disaster strikes again.

One billion of the world’s poorest people, including many Haitians, rely on their animals for food, transport and their livelihoods. As a result of our work, governments have begun to understand how crucially important it is to protect animals to help their people before a earthquake, flood, hurricane or drought hits. We’ve worked with many of them to install typhoon-resistant shelters and other prevention and preparedness solutions we have developed over the years for farm animals which decrease animal suffering in a disaster and increase a community’s ability to secure their future livelihoods.

Five years after the Haiti quake hit, we were also able to secure an historic agreement from the United Nations Member States to measure the impact on animals in disasters as part of its Disaster Risk Reduction. This will mean more animals will be better protected from mother nature, which in turn will protect the wellbeing and economic survival of communities in danger zones around the world.

12 January 2010 was one of the deadliest days in the history of the world. 2017 brought yet more destruction and chaos to the Caribbean as hurricane after hurricane ploughed in to the islands. With the frequency and intensity of disasters increasing due to climate change, it’s absolutely critical that governments in danger zones continue to do more to prepare for the inevitable by ensuring the protection of animals in their national emergency plans. We are working on this life and death issue with countries around the world as a matter of urgency. So many people in so many countries rely on their animals for their own survival.

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Goodbye Max https://petforest.ru/goodbye-max/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 08:03:09 +0000 http://adforest.scriptsbundle.com/petforest/?p=9489

Max, a beloved resident of the supporter-funded bear sanctuary in Romania, has passed away peacefully after a short illness.

Poached from the wild as a cub in 1997, Max endured 11 years as a photo prop for tourists in the town of Sinaia, Romania. By the time he was rescued, he’d been chained to the same spot for so long his weight had bent the iron fence he leaned on.

 

Max was brought to safety at the Zarnesti bear sanctuary in 2006. After an extensive health-check, our vets found his eyes were badly damaged, and surgery couldn’t help. Years of abuse – we think from repeated blows to his head – had cost this beautiful brown bear his sight.

 

Despite his blindness, Max was brave. Feeling the forest earth for the first time beneath his paws, smelling the other bears nearby and foraging for acorns gave him a new lease of life. When he showed a love for swimming, you – our amazing supporters – helped fund a special, accessible pool. He loved to bathe and play in it every single day.

 

Max’s disabilities made him too vulnerable to live with more active, boisterous bears. But thankfully, he was never alone. His slow, gentle nature calmed Monica – a small, feisty brown bear – and they became friends and roommates. She had picked fights with most of the other bears, but Max and Monica found peace and happiness together.

 

Aged 22, Max wasn’t particularly old for a bear when he died. The years of abuse had worn him down, despite the best efforts of staff to treat and care for him. But of some comfort to all the people around the world who loved him was that his final years were peaceful. He had all the tasty food, forest space, swimming time and company he could ever need.

RIP Max, 1997 – 2018

 

Max’s memory will be in our hearts forever, and our partners at Zarnesti, the Millions of Friends Association, will hold a special memorial service to remember him.

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Puppy’s First Grooming – Groomer’s Corner https://petforest.ru/puppys-first-grooming-groomers-corner/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 07:55:03 +0000 http://adforest.scriptsbundle.com/petforest/?p=9480 At What Age Can I Start Getting My Puppy Groomed?

Officially it is best to wait until your new puppy is 8 weeks old, and can leave their mother before you consider getting them groomed. Once the puppy has been introduced to its new home and has established relations with the new owner they can think about getting the puppy groomed. That Groom Room recommends starting at 12 weeks of age. The very first grooming appointment is an introduction to the puppy and the owner to the world of grooming. The puppy with be introduced to a bath, blow drying, nail clipping, and slight trimming. We do not recommend having a puppy be given a full hair cut the first time being groomed. The reason behind this is you are forcing the puppy to stand still and be handled for 1.5 hours. This is a lot to ask of a puppy. It would be like asking a one year old child to sit without moving, going to the bathroom, or play with any toys for 45 minutes. That is why we only do the basics for puppies first groom. We bathe them, slowly dry them, trim the nails, trim the fur from around their eyes, pads, and around the sanitary area. This is about all they can handle. The puppy will be introduced to having scissors around the face, having to hold still while the pads on their feet are trimmed. Depending on how the puppy reacts to the first grooming we may recommend doing this type of trimming one more time before the full haircut. The more comfortable the puppy becomes with being handled by the groomer and being on a table, and in the tub the better the puppy will become as they grow up.

 

What Can You Do to Help?

It becomes more difficult to groom a puppy that is 6 months old for the first time than a 12-week-old puppy. The 6-month-old has already established fears and aggression. For example, it would be like taking a 5-year-old child and putting them in kindergarten without any discipline and experience of a pre-school and making them sit still and raise their hand when called on by the teacher. At this point in a puppy’s life if the owner has not prepped the puppy with any type of grooming; brushing, combing, or nail trimming. It makes the groomers job nearly impossible to have the puppy trust them and enjoy grooming.

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Softer and Sweeter: A Reactive Dog Grows Up https://petforest.ru/softer-and-sweeter-a-reactive-dog-grows-up/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 07:51:36 +0000 http://adforest.scriptsbundle.com/petforest/?p=9476 This blog began with the challenges of a reactive dog. Some day I’ll tell you the story of when Ruby’s reactivity first appeared and how I spent a lot of time blaming myself and the choices I made for it.

Today I’m here to tell you that Ruby is still – will always be – a reactive dog, but how mostly it isn’t an issue anymore. It isn’t an issue not because I am not constantly managing it and making decisions around Ruby’s reactivity, but because it doesn’t define us, and because if there is one thing you can count on, it’s change. Ruby has softened and sweetened before my very eyes, daring me to be less afraid and to trust her with things that were previously out of our comfort zone.

Let me be clear: Ruby is still a maniac on the leash when she sees other dogs or bicycles, but if I time it right, I can significantly reduce the severity of her reaction by simply picking her up. Since I wrote this post, Ruby now looks to me whenever she is uncomfortable or in need of some reassurance to scoop her into my arms. I’m lucky she’s small enough to do so, and I don’t think it’s a cheat or a sign that she’s spoiled – it’s simply what works for us.

Recently I took Ruby and Boca to visit our dear friend at her farm on the prairie, complete with three dogs, three cats, a herd of horses, donkeys, goats and llamas and a flock of ducks – a veritable menagerie of triggers, right? Not to mention that first we had to get there, in the car. I solved Ruby’s car-barking by getting her a crate for road trips, but the unfortunate trade-off is that riding in the crate exacerbates her car sickness. I decided to compromise by leaving the mesh door unzipped so that she could come out of the crate on her own once we set off.

Ruby exited her crate by the time we reached the freeway, and soon there was a motorcycle in front of us – one of her triggers. I glanced back to confirm that yes, Ruby definitely saw the motorcycle. And didn’t bark. We saw two more on our round trip – still no barking. Best of all – no puking! Boca was not thrilled to give up part of the seat and eventually curled up in the snug travel crate – an amusing sight. Four ginger dogs and one black dog romped around my friend’s yard for hours and tried their luck with several disciplinarian cats. Ruby got her fill of barking at real-life horses and made a new terrier friend (a fellow Jack Russell mix with whom she exchanged hilariously spastic play-bows) all without incident. It was a glorious day for everyone.

Another small win this month was that I was able to comb out the mats in Ruby’s increasingly long Border Collie-esque pantaloon feathers (technical term). She used to be afraid of the comb, and suspicious of most grooming activities. Now she accepts nail clipping, paw massages and feather-untangling. She wags her pretty paintbrush tail more, in wide sideways sweeps. She lays upside down and makes adorable blissful grunts and implores me to scratch her armpits. These changes are evidence of the growing security she feels, and it makes my heart soar to see her breathe a little deeper, settling into her own skin and the life and routines she can feel safe within.

One of my goals for Ruby and I this summer is to take her on a solo backpacking trip. This will come with its own challenges – like swiftly scooping her up if I need to with a 30 pound pack on my back- but I believe the memories and experience it will entail outweigh the hurdles. Last night my boyfriend and I did a test-pitch of my new tent – a bright yellow, crinkly, novel object – and much to my delight and surprise, as soon as the door was unzipped, my (not so) timid little red-and-white dog climbed right in! Ruby is ready for new adventures, and a constant reminder that we are always evolving, that curiosity can overcome fear, and that who we are is never limited by who we were.

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A Beautiful Cat For Sale https://petforest.ru/a-beautiful-cat-for-sale/ Mon, 20 Feb 2017 11:01:35 +0000 http://adforest.scriptsbundle.com/petforest/?p=514 Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer quis erat sed lorem dictum ullamcorper. Sed vel elit sed nunc ornare auctor. Suspendisse id ullamcorper purus, sed cursus dui. Sed eget elit magna. Morbi pellentesque gravida vehicula. Nunc ullamcorper rutrum nunc, non consectetur ante egestas non. Donec elementum est at velit accumsan, nec accumsan neque porta. Nunc iaculis condimentum ipsum, eget molestie nulla.

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